Category Archives: Marxism

The Illusion of the Equality of Opportunity

Marxist sociologists Bowles and Gintis argue that capitalist societies are not meritocratic. Against Functionalists, they argue that it is not the amount of ability and effort an individual puts into their education that determines how well they do, but rather … Continue reading

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Goldman Sachs Worried About Rising Wages….

In this recent post ‘ America is getting a raise and Goldman Sachs is freaking out about it ‘ Nick Casella cites an extract from investment bank Goldman Sachs’ daily newsletter ‘ Global Markets Daily’ which indicates that they think rising … Continue reading

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Bowles and Gintis: The Correspondence Principle

Marxists sociologists Bowles and Gintis (1976) argue that the main function of education in capitalist societies is the reproduction of labour power. They see the education system as being subservient to and performing functions for the Bourgeoisie, the capitalist class … Continue reading

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Why workers aren’t benefiting from the automation of jobs…

The increasing automation of jobs could (should?) result in us all working less – but instead, most of us seem to working just as longer hours as ever, why is this – a little dose of Marxism actually goes a … Continue reading

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Philip Green, the Collapse of BHS and the Continued Relevance of Marxist Theory

This is a useful documentary on the role of billionaire Philip Green in the  collapse of British Home Stores, which demonstrates the relevance of some key concepts within Marxism. British Home Stores was one of the best known high street retail … Continue reading

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Zygmunt Bauman’s Liquid Times – A Summary

Zygmunt Bauman is one of the world’s leading sociologists. He is particularly interested in how the west’s increasing obsession with ‘individualism’ actually prevents the individual from being free in any meaningful sense of the word. In  ‘Liquid Times (2007), Bauman … Continue reading

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Zygmunt Bauman’s Liquid Modernity – A Summary of Chapter One

A brief summary of Zygmunt Bauman’s Liquid Modernity, chapter one. A level sociology labels Bauman as a postmodern Marxist. Chapter One – Emancipation The chapter begins with Marcuse’s complaint (writing in the 1970s) that most people don’t see the need … Continue reading

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Marxism – A Level Sociology Revision Notes

Karl Marx and Louis Althusser are Modernist, Structural Conflict Theorists while Antonio Gramsci is  a Humanist Conflict Theorist. Karl Marx: Key Ideas Two classes – Bourgeois – Proletariat Relationship between them is Exploitation/ Surplus Value The Base (economy) determines the … Continue reading

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Althusser’s Scientific Marxism

While humanistic Marxists see humans as creative beings, able to make history through their conscious actions, for structuralist Marxists, it is social structures that shape human action, and we should be researching structures not individuals. The most important structural Marxist … Continue reading

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Gramsci’s Humanist Marxism

Gramsci (1891-1937) was the first leader of the Italian Communist Party during the 20s. He introduced the concept of hegemony or ideological and moral leadership of society, to explain how the ruling class maintains its position and argued that the … Continue reading

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