Category Archives: Pot Luck

An Introduction to Social Action Theory

This post introduces the key idea of social action theory in simplified form for first year A-level sociology students… Unlike structural consensus and conflict theorists social action theorists do not try to explain human behaviour in terms of an objective … Continue reading

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What is the United Kingdom Census?

  The UK National Census is one of the best known examples of government statistics.     The last UK census took place on 27 March 2011. Statistics from the UK censuses help paint a picture of the nation and … Continue reading

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A Very Brief History of the Democratic Republic of Congo

This year I’m using the DRC as a major case study in underdevelopment (it is last on the UN’s HDI rankings after all) – Here’s my (mainly cut and paste from Wikipedia) very brief history of the DRC – I’ll … Continue reading

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Surveys on Family Life in the UK

Social Surveys are one of the most common methods for routinely collecting data in sociology and the social sciences more generally. There are lots of examples of where we use social surveys throughout the families and households module in the … Continue reading

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How I would’ve answered the AQA A level sociology of education exam, June 2017

Answers to the AQA’s A-level sociology education with theory and methods exam, June 2017… Just a few thoughts to put students out of their misery. (Ideas my own, not endorsed by the AQA – NB – there is a certain level of … Continue reading

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Responses to Globalization

Seabrook (1) argues there are three principle responses to globalization: Fatalism A fatalistic response, which states that the world is simply powerless to resist globalization. Seabrook argues that most leaders of the developed world take the position that globalization is … Continue reading

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How Does Globalisation Impact Family Life?

Globalisation is the increasing interconnectedness of countries (and the people within them) across the globe – below are just a few (very brief) thoughts on how globalisation might impact family life the United Kingdom… Increased immigration – more family diversity, … Continue reading

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AQA Exam Paper 7191 (2): Research Methods with Families and Households

An overview of the AS Sociology paper 7191 (2), and a few quick hints and tips on how to answer each of the questions… NB – Technically this paper is research methods with topics in sociology, but nearly everyone does … Continue reading

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Assess the View that Theoretical Factors are the most Important Factor Influencing Choice of Research Method (30)

Just a few thoughts on how you might answer this in the exam.  Introduction – A variety of factors influence a Sociologist’s decision as to what research method they use: the nature of topic, theoretical, practical and ethical factors. Theoretical … Continue reading

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Assess the View that Economic Indicators Provide an Unsatisfactory Picture of Development

Economic definitions and ways of measuring development are unsatisfactory. A much clearer and more useful picture emerges when wider social factors are included.’ Assess this view of development and underdevelopment. (20) International organizations such as the World Bank prefer to … Continue reading

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